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How to Install Golf Shaft Extenders

A common repair that most of you will be faced with (or have been faced with in the past) is the extending of shafts. Extending shafts is a relatively simple operation that can add substantial profits to your shop. Today’s tip involves the extension of graphite shafts and steel shafts. A few tips to follow:

Extending Graphite Shafts

1. Never extend a graphite shaft more than 2″. Any more may cause premature failure due to stress where the extension is made.

2. Always use either graphite or aluminum to extend a graphite shaft. Using steel will create a shear point where the extension is made, causing almost certain shaft failure.

3. Always epoxy the extension in place, do not rely on a pressure fit.

4. Try to abrade the extension piece prior to installation to give the epoxy a better hold.

5. Saving your old graphite shafts to use as shaft extenders will save you money and will make a perfectly acceptable extender.

6. Remember that extending the shaft will make it feel a bit more flexible and that every ½” longer the shaft becomes will increase the club’s swingweight 3 points. The total weight of the club will increase equal to the weight of the extender and epoxy as well. The club’s balance point will move toward the grip end as well due to the longer length of the club.

VIEW THE GRAPHITE SHAFT EXTENDERS IN ACTION BELOW IN “HOW TO INSTALL GRAPHITE SHAFT EXTENDERS” VIDEO

Extending Steel Shafts

1. Never extend a steel shaft more than 2″. Any more may cause premature failure due to stress where the extension is made.

2. We recommend using a steel extender to extend a steel shaft.

Using other materials may lead to premature breakage. Wooden dowels can also be used to extend steel shafts, but these require much more work (in our opinion) than using steel extenders.

3. Always epoxy the extension in place, do not rely on a pressure fit.

4. Abrade the extension piece prior to installation to give the epoxy a better hold. This is especially vital when using steel extensions that are unplated.

5. Saving your used steel shafts to use as shaft extenders will save you money and will make a perfectly acceptable extender.

6. Remember that extending the shaft will make it feel a bit more flexible and that every ½” longer the shaft becomes will increase the club’s swingweight 3 points. The total weight of the club will increase equal to the weight of the extender and epoxy as well. The club’s balance point will move toward the grip end as well due to the longer length of the club.

Extending shafts is a common and profitable repair. Following the above common-sense rules will make the repair practical and safe.

by Jeff Summitt
Hireko Technical Director
[email protected]

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